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Author Topic: All Pain is in the Brain!  (Read 2955 times)

Offline AlecB

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All Pain is in the Brain!
« on: November 27, 2019, 09:45:56 PM »
I'm currently reading the second book by Les Fehmi called "Dissolving Pain" and here is an excerpt for anybody doubting the power that meditation can have. May this passage give you inspiration and motivate you...

Quote
The Emerging Role of the Brain

In 1994, another milestone in the thinking about pain and emotions occurred. Dr. Frederick Lenz, a neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, was operating on the brain of a fully awake patient. The man had uncontrollable hand tremors that made his life extremely difficult. Even typing on a keyboard was a challenge. He sought help from Lenz, who treated such patients by destroying a few damaged cells in the brain’s thalamus, cells that contribute to such tremors. The patient also had a different, unassociated problem—severe panic disorders that caused chest pain, shortness of breath, and a pounding heart. A psychologist who had assessed the patient, though, thought the patient would do fine in surgery and the panic disorder would not cause complications. With the patient fully conscious, under only a local anesthetic, Lenz drilled a hole in his skull. As he probed with a tiny electrical stimulator for the correct brain cells, he accidentally stimulated nearby cells that governed the patient’s
arm. Such stimulation in other patients caused a slight tingling in their arm. In this patient, however, it engendered a full-blown panic attack, causing feelings of suffocation and anxiety. Lenz was surprised. As the feelings died down, he disbelieved what had happened and tried stimulating the site again. Again, the discomfort of a panic attack rose up in the patient. Lenz moved on and cauterized the cells that caused the tremor. Lenz was incredulous and remembered a similar occurrence. A woman with a history of heart pain, who came in for cauterization, also had a panic attack at the touch of the stimulator. These symptoms, which were wildly out of proportion to the stimulus and caused just a tingling sensation in most people, led Lenz to conclude that areas of the brain could become unstable in some people. “Lenz saw that areas of the brain governing ordinary sensations could become abnormally sensitized,” wrote Dr. Atul Gawande, a neurosurgeon, in a 1998 article on this topic in the New Yorker. Gawande went on to explain the significance of Lenz’s discoveries as follows: “Lenz’s finding suggests all pain is in the head. It is the brain that generates the pain experience, and it can do so even in the absence of external stimuli.” This new understanding of the power of the brain in the pain experience finally explains the phenomenon of phantom limb pain. Areas of the brain associated with the missing limb can still, mistakenly, generate pain, probably because they are sensitized. Lenz theorized the brain contains “neuromodules,” circuits that fire throughout the brain that are similar to programs on a computer. Using these “programs” is how the brain binds together perceptual montages that include mood, senses, memory, and so forth from disparate regions of the brain. These highly sensitive neuromodules that govern, say, the lower back, in other words, are not fired to cause pain only when the back is physically injured. These networks of neurons can become so unstable they go haywire, and they can be set off by a host of triggers—moods, memories, stress, emotions, even seemingly nothing—and, in the complete absence of physical trauma, cause pain, even serious pain. The most significant factor at the root of pain, in other words, is a hypersensitive, unstable brain. This is the understanding of pain that lies at the heart of our Open-Focus approach. Open-Focus training engenders a more stable brain.

Fehmi, Les. Dissolving Pain (pp. 53-54). Shambhala. Kindle Edition.

This is why the Infinite Void meditation developed by Dr. Dispenza works to re-shape the entire gray matter of the brain so quickly!

I've been having chest pains for no apparent reason, other than what I could surmise is building anxiety over the past 15 years with no release, sometimes feeling like a heart-attack! and yet the cardiologist could not find anything wrong with me!

After starting Dr. Dispenzas meditations and doing some Open-Focus techniques by Les Fehmi, I'm convinced there is absolutely nothing wrong with me, except for my head! my pain has deminished from 7, 8 or even 9 sometimes, to 4 or 3 now. The power of the mind is amazing.

Offline Me78

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Re: All Pain is in the Brain!
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2019, 03:01:05 PM »
Thx for sharing this. I've just started the open focus training by Les Fehmi. I'm also reading his first book (in order tobreduce my parkinson's symptoms). I'm combining it with the botec meditations of dr Joe.

Do you think you can learn the open focus on your own? I want to do it properly but how can I be sure. Here in Belgium, there are no trainers.

Offline Walk in Beauty

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Re: All Pain is in the Brain!
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2019, 04:49:03 PM »
I think with time you will master open focus Me78. It is merely completely emptying your mind and sensing the vastness of empty space. Especially if you do a daily meditation practice at the same time everyday.

I have read from many metaphysical source that all pain is an illusion, and part of the reason why we are here is to vanquish pain and fear.

Offline Kathy

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Re: All Pain is in the Brain!
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2019, 06:42:03 PM »
Fascinating!

I'm not seeing any meditations about "Infinite Void" in Dr. Joe's storefront. Is there a source you can point to AlecB?

On a related topic, I found myself wondering today WHAT Dr. Joe meditation might be best for healing. My favorite BOTEC (thus far) is the original - version 1. But, I'm wondering what might be even better SPECIFICALLY for healing/health.

Thoughts?
(That also made me think, wouldn't it be awesome if Dr. Joe came up with some additional topic-specific meditations like his "abundance" one? Like, one for health/healing. :) )

Offline Walk in Beauty

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Re: All Pain is in the Brain!
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2019, 05:37:52 AM »
Kathy, I would say “Changing Boxes” was good for health, I ALWAYS listen to the introduction before I do any of the meditations, he describes exactly why and how it works.

What my help you and John along is taking the online workshops. The intensive workshop is on dvds and you can have it forever. Dr Joe in lecture is so compelling, his earnestness and explanations. The Progressive is 93 day access. I looped both workshops continually when I took them.

Offline Kathy

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Re: All Pain is in the Brain!
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2019, 08:09:53 AM »
Thank you WiB! I'll talk to John about this as well.

I agree about Dr. Joe and lectures - I can't seem to get enough of it!